Getting prescriptions filled … I have read so much on social media about restrictions Australia wide, I wanted to find out more.
Yep … I’m one of those blokes that has to take daily medication, as does my wife.
This is where I admit to having one of those weekly pill box organisers, just like my grand father did.
Hang on … I’m a grand father … bugger!

 

Any way, we still have to visit the doctor every now and then to get a check up and get our prescriptions updated.
So what choices do we have when we take off around Oz on a more permanent basis?
We could talk to our doctor about getting our prescribe medications dispensed for the longer period of 6 months, bit of paper work apparently, but it can be done,.

Pharmacists can also pack our pills in sealed, labelled ‘vac’ packs for ease of dispensing, but we’d have to consider where to keep them, do they need to be kept at certain temperatures?
It’s probably better to get the prescriptions filled as we travel, as I mentioned above, I have read so much on social media about restrictions, particularly in WA … good old social media.
Plus I figure, a quick check up if required wouldn’t hurt.

So … I decided to check with my pharmacist here in SA and was told that rules ‘these days’, meant that there should be no issue accessing medication when travelling, he said that in the past, it might have been an issue.
He said that if I had any doubts I could contact the Department Of Health … so I did (not that I didn’t trust him, just wanted some research), and here was their answer. Medicines available on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) are available to all Australians and prescriptions for these medicines can usually be filled in states and territories outside of those in which they have been provided.

 

There you go … in theory we should be just fine, where ever we go, although they did use the word … usually.

 

Here’s my disclaimer …
Naturally, we are all different and probably take different medications so please check prior to taking off … just to be sure.

Here’s the full reply …

Dear Mr Kennedy,

Thank you for your correspondence of 8 September 2016 regarding prescriptions being filled interstate.
Medicines available on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) are available to all Australians and prescriptions for these medicines can usually be filled in states and territories outside of those in which they have been provided.
However, please note that state and territory regulations apply to a range of medicines, such as those classed as Controlled Drugs (such as opioid analgesics). These regulations are publicly available on the relevant state and territory health department websites.
In addition, all suppliers of PBS medicines must be approved by the Department of Human Services. These will be pharmacists, doctors in certain remote and rural areas, Friendly Society pharmacies, or hospital authorities.
Pharmaceutical benefits are mainly supplied by approved pharmacists – pharmacists who comply with certain conditions. These pharmacists are approved to dispense pharmaceutical benefits from a particular pharmacy.
Other suppliers include approved doctors (usually practising in isolated areas), Friendly Society pharmacies, and approved hospitals. All suppliers are issued with approval numbers by the Department of Human Services.
An approved pharmacist may only supply pharmaceutical benefits at or from premises for which they have been approved.
Unapproved pharmacists cannot supply pharmaceutical benefits.
The patient’s doctor is best placed to explain whether the regulations in the relevant jurisdiction are a factor in the quantities and repeats he or she is permitted to order on each prescription.
We trust this information is of assistance.

Kind regards,
PBS Information

This information is not intended to give or replace any legal, medical, dental or optometrical advice. This document is not a legal document and does not constitute legal advice. Neither the information nor this document can be relied upon without first seeking and obtaining independent legal, medical, dental or optometrical advice beforehand.